You’re Not Crazy, Just Different — DSM (Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

Being different is not a bad thing. Embrace your differences because they only make you unique compared to others around you. Don’t be embarrassed of your mental illness.

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Diabulimia

diabulimiaDIABULIMIA, also known as ED-DMT1 or Eating Disorder-Diabetes Mellitus Type 1, is a type of eating disorder that affects people with type-1 diabetes. People suffering from diabulimia deliberately restrict insulin in an attempt to lose weight. Although there is no distinct diagnostic code for diabulimia, in DSM-5, based on the eating disorder behavior and manipulation of insulin, diabulimia can present with features of both bulimia and anorexia. Diabulimia can be classified under Other Specified Eating Disorder (OSFED) in DSM-5.

Rumination Disorder

Rumination-disorderRUMINATION DISORDER, also known as rumination syndrome, is a rare and chronic eating disorder. Individuals with Rumination Disorder unintentionally and repeatedly regurgitate food before swallowing it again, chewing it once more or spitting it out. They often spit up food from their stomach; re-chew partially digested or undigested food unintentionally and either re-swallow or spit it out. As per the reports of the patients, since the food hasn’t yet been digested, it isn’t acidic, as vomit is and tastes normal. Rumination usually happens soon after eating, at every meal but it appears to be the result of increased abdominal pressure.

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13 Viktor E. Frankl Quotes

Viktor_Frankl1. Evermore people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for.

2. Don’t aim at success. The more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you are going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued; it must ensue, and it only does so as the unintended side-effect of one’s personal dedication to a cause greater.

3. Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.

4. Faith is trust in ultimate meaning.

5. For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person’s life at a given moment.

6. For the world is in a bad state, but everything will become still worse unless each of us does his best.

7. If there is a meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death, human life cannot be complete.

8. In some ways suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, such as the meaning of a sacrifice.

9. Live as if you were living a second time, and as though you had acted wrongly the first time.

10. Love is the only way to grasp another human being in the innermost core of his personality.

11. Religion is the search for ultimate meaning.

12. Those who have a ‘why’ to live, can bear with almost any ‘how’.

13. We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: 1. by doing a deed; 2. by experiencing a value; and 3. by suffering.

Same Mental Illness, Different Perception Of Reality — DSM (Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

The subjectivity related to the field of mental health has a lot to do with the many different versions of a particular mental illness. Someone with MDD may by suffering from a decreased appetite and sleep, while another person with atypical depression may be experiencing an increased appetite and sleep. Mental illness may affect everyone differently even if the diagnosis is the same. That’s why we cannot assume that we understand what everyone is going through. . .

via Same Mental Illness, Different Perception Of Reality — DSM (Defeating Stigma Mindfully)

ADHD Kids

FDA Approves First-ever Game-based DT Device to Help Children with ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common neuro-developmental disorders found among children. It is often diagnosed in childhood and often lasts into adulthood. ADHD affects around 4 million children between the ages of 6–11 years. Common symptoms of ADHD include difficulty paying attention and remaining focused, trouble controlling behavior, and extreme levels of activity. As per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, only a trained healthcare professional can make the diagnosis of ADHD and the diagnosis should follow an assessment of pattern of symptoms, which include inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that interfere with normal functioning and development.

In its landmark decision, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given a green light to the marketing and use of the first game-based digital therapeutic (DT) device to help children with ADHD improve their attention function. The Akili Interactive’s EndeavorRX, previously known as Project EVO, is the first-of-its-kind video game which can be legally marketed and prescribed by doctors and professionals as a form of medicine in the US.

video game on iphoneAfter undergoing seven years of clinical trials that studied over 600 children, FDA has authorized doctors to prescribe the iPhone and iPad game for children, between the ages 8 to 12, with mainly inattentive or combined-type ADHD, who have demonstrated issues with attention. Before its authorization as a treatment method, FDA reviewed data from multiple studies conducted on over 600 children, including studies that examined, whether participants exhibited improvements in attention function, as measured by the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), academic performance measures, and other assessment tools.

The prescription-only game called EndeavorRx has been proven to enhance attention function among children with ADHD, as measured by computer-based testing. It is the first digital therapeutic technique intended to better the symptoms related to ADHD, in addition to being the first game-based therapeutic technique to be granted marketing authorization by the FDA for any sort of condition. The gaming device is proposed to be used along with therapeutic program involving clinician-directed therapy, medication, and/or educational programs, that further address symptoms of the disorder.

Will it work? As per the studies conducted by the company itself, the answer is yes. According to one of the studies, after playing the obstacle-dodging, target-collecting game for 25 minutes a day, five days a week for four weeks, one-third of kids no longer had a measurable attention deficit on at least one measure of objective attention.

As per the developer company, after a month of treatment with the game, improvements in ADHD impairments were maintained for up to a month. Major side effects included seemingly mild frustration, headache, dizziness, emotional reaction, and aggression as compared to traditional drug treatment.

FDA is working on providing timely and easy access to this innovative, easy and safe therapeutic technique to the patients.

Overly Stressed? Make Use of Forest Baths to Increase Your Cortisol Level — Human Performance Psychology

Excellent news for nature lovers: the forest does us good and it is science that says it. Silvotherapy or tree therapy is a recognized medical practice in Japan. In the Japanese forests, there are therapeutic paths for travelers to take […]

via Overly Stressed? Make Use of Forest Baths to Increase Your Cortisol Level — Human Performance Psychology

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Interesting Facts about Human Memory

1. The human mind can form, amplify, or reinvent a memory.

2. Short term memory (STM) and long term memory (LTM) are two different types of memories. Short term memory can hold 7±2 things for up to 20 seconds. Information received from the environment, first passes through short term memory before it becomes the part of long term memory.

3. Humans start to form memories when they are in the womb. This memory is described as prenatal or fetal memory. Various experiments have revealed that babies are capable of remembering sounds that were played to them during pregnancy.

4. The storage capacity of the human brain is practically limitless. Human brain can store approximately 2.5 petabytes of data, which means that human brain has as much memory as the entire internet.

5. Apparently, aging does not seem to have any direct effect on memory. People experience memory loss during old age merely because they use it less as they age.

6. The human mind can remember things that didn’t even occur. This obvious recollection of something that one did not actually experience is known as false memory. This phenomenon was demonstrated in an experiment where the interviewer was successfully able to convince 70% of the participants that they had committed a crime, when, in fact, they had not.

7. In the absence of rehearsal, memories become harder to access, this means that memories, in actual, do not decay.

8. During jet lag, certain stress hormones are released, which have been found to damage the memory.

9. While a person is drunk, he or she is not capable of creating memories.

10. There is no specific region in the brain where a given memory exists. Instead, it is distributed in different regions of the brain.

11. Memory is reconstructed from distinct fragments in order to be recalled.

12. Human memories are prioritized by the emotions. Emotions attach new information and function as an indicator of significance. Memories that are emotionally intense can last longer in the mind and can be recalled much more clearly.

13. Procrastination is an important tool of memory. Not focusing on something actively gives the subconscious time to work on the ideas in the background while the person performs other things.

Bulimia Nervosa

bulimia purgingA potentially life-threatening eating disorder, BULIMIA NERVOSA is characterized by binge eating followed by purging. People with Bulimia Nervosa often eat a large quantity of food in one go. This binge eating episode accompanied by a sense of loss of control of the overeating process causes a feeling of guilt and recurrent inappropriate behavior intended to prevent weight gain. This phenomenon is called purging, which includes, in addition to the use of purgatives, such measures as dietary fasting, excessive exercising, use of laxatives or self-induced vomiting, and even taking of thyroid medication to increase metabolism.

Learn To Love Yourself First. — Deborah Byrne Psychology Services

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In order to know what you deserve you must love yourself first. Take the time to recognise all your strengths. Celebrate all your successes. Surround everything you do with kindness and self-compassion for yourself. Practice self-care, gratitude and build your positive mindset daily. So for today: How will you love yourself first? The post…

via Learn To Love Yourself First. — Deborah Byrne Psychology Services

Anorexia Nervosa

Thin womanA person suffering from ANOREXIA NERVOSA often experiences a strong fear of gaining weight which leads to a refusal to maintain a healthy body weight or adequate nutritional status. Anorexia nervosa is typically associated with an erroneous complaint of being fat; weight loss up to 85% of ideal body weight (IBW); disturbance of body image; and in post-menarcheal females, the absence of at least three consecutive menstrual periods. An individual suffering from anorexia follows extreme steps to maintain a low body weight. He or she may try to lose weight by excessive exercise, or by using laxatives and vomiting as measure to get rid of the food from the body. It is considered one of the deadliest psychiatric disorders. In the absence of effective treatment, around 20%, of the people with anorexia die.

 

man washing hand

The Reality of OCD During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Source link: https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/health/the-anxiety-and-reality-of-obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic/article31832099.ece

Cover your face, scrub your hands, repeat. The pandemic has heightened anxieties of infection, even more so for people with obsessive compulsive disorder

Once in every 20 minutes, like clockwork, Sivakumar Bharati* washes his hands and checks if the window are shut. “I have not ‘relaxed’ in three months aside from my REM sleep,” he says. “There is the prevalent fear of germs and contamination which is why the pandemic has been particularly stressful.”

This is the reality of OCD or obsessive compulsive disorder.

“You don’t really take notice of it until someone else points it out — and a lot of people did,” says 59-year-old retiree Sivakumar . “And back in the 70s, mental health was not taken seriously. People back then just thought I was militant about being neat, some poked fun at it.”

Sivakumar’s home in Hyderabad is evident of his obsessive compulsive disorder: to want everything symmetrical, no clutter, even the presence of muted tones. There are moments of anger and frustration where if things are not lined up, there would be a meltdown, curable only by the correct positioning and considerable time to cool off.

Chennai-based Professor Dr Gauthamadas Udipi, specialist in neuro-behavioural medicine, who has worked with people with OCD for almost many years explains, “OCD may only be the behavioural marker of a more extensive systemic disorder. “After all, the mind is only an expression of the functioning of the brain, and the brain is only a part of the body. At one end of the OC spectrum is ‘normal’ obsessive thinking and ordered behaviour in daily life, which does not interfere significantly with daily functioning. At the other end is severe obsessive rumination and compulsive behaviour that does not allow daily function.”

Essentially, the underlying pathology is in the Salience Network (SalNet) or ‘worry-loop’ of the brain, which sees a person having uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts and/or behaviours that they feel the urge to repeat over and over; it can be especially harrowing now, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic which invites uncertainty, rising tensions and innumerable risk factors. Often caused by severe psychological stresses, OCD manifests in different forms, from ritualistic obsessions to suicidal compulsions. Sivakumar is on the lower end of this spectrum, and it took a long time for him to realise what he had.

‘I’m OCD about that’

Sivakumar, during the late 2010s, was finally formally diagnosed by a neurologist in South Africa, who stated that OCD is a legitimate condition — and not one about which to be ashamed. “I remember him mentioning how popular culture had not even normalised but trivialised OCD. The parameters of what was ‘deemed’ OCD had shifted in a big way; people thought being tidy was OCD,” recalls Sivakumar.

And things have not been easy as the pandemic trudges on.

Dr Udipi affirms that the pandemic can be a heightener, explaining, it could “result in triggering underlying OC spectrum disorders in a genetically prone person, tilt the balance from ‘normal’ obsessions to a pathological OC pattern, or worsen an already existing OC disorder.”

The International OCD Foundation, Boston, sees the unique challenges for the OCD-afflicted and has offered numerous online resources, which are free-to-use and which help people run through their OCD anxiety with some ease while maintaining physical distancing. These options include WHO-approved tips on how to deal with contamination fears, video teletherapy, which helps those with OCD find a licensed teletherapy provider while retaining physical distancing, and printable coping cards. These cards, not a replacement for help from a medical professional, are written reminders and questions for the self to be mindful, breathe easy, take back control and understand that progress is better than perfection.

Dr Udipi adds that empathy from close friends and family is helpful. “[They] must understand that this is a disorder originating in brain circuits over which the person has little control, and advising the person that ‘it is all in the mind’, and ‘learn to control it’ is of no use, and that yoga, meditation, and other ‘self-therapies’ will not work in the case of a ‘pure obsessive thinking’ (which occurs in a very small percentage of people with SalNet disorder), as the person cannot bring the mind to focus on them due to pure circuit overdrive.” He emphasises that early identification and proper treatment by a qualified psychiatrist and team is the key.

Sivakumar agrees, concluding, “There are times you may not feel worthy because you feel like you are adding stress to home life or work life. But when you start humanising yourself with the help of a mindful and informed healthcare professional, it helps tremendously. It also helped that my family and I could find common ground with patience. But for other OCD folks out there, you have to want to accept it as a condition and not as an extension of the self. It’s emotionally taxing to go through it because your mind is telling you that this obsessive order of things is paramount.”

* Name changed to protect identity

How is Fear of Covid-19 Changing Our Psychology? — Human Performance Psychology

As expected and common, the phenomenon posed by the threat of disease in recent months is still astonishing and intriguing, at least for the youngest who have not yet undergone major and sudden changes. The crisis staggered by this virus is not only occupying much of our thinking, but it seems to be more like […]

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